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138, 171, 203, 233, 263, 303, 324, 354, 384, 414, 420. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Auk (3)], 2 ('pdf' file, p#5, Auk featured in a 2 minute 'British Film Institute' film, as a collier perhaps), 3, 4 & 5 (images, Auk), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). One wonders, however, why George Clark, an engineer, was connected with the building of a ship, and why this launch, which took place on February 27, 1852, was the only one with which he was associated.

(73.76 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 251.9 ft. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. But as a result of the nationalisation of the electricity industry, the vessel was delivered to 'British Electricity Authority'. Per 1 (image Pompey Power), 2 (13 images, Hamen) & 3 (data, Hamen), but you must now register to see both of those links, alas, 4 & 5 (data & images, in Norwegian), 6 (lots of images available), 7 (fine Hamen restoration video), 8 (data, images & plans, low on page), 9 (data), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). (73.76 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 251.9 ft. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. Carried coal from the North East to coal-fired power plants at Portsmouth. The vessel was painted by artist Laurence Bagley (53 x 78 cm. Pompey Power was featured in 'Mining Review 2nd Year No. I regret my inability in Norwegian - the vessel's current status? Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Likely used to carry coal from the North East to London power stations. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was sold in 1974 to 'Misano di Navigazione Sp A', also of Cagliani, in 1979 to 'Francesco Saverio Salonia', of Rome, in 1980 to 'Pompa M. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Brent Knoll became redundant. The vessel was sold, in 1976, to 'Erika Shipping Co. Also in 1986, the vessel was sold to 'Lotus Shipping Ltd.', also of Colon, Panama, with no change of name. 27, 1994, the vessel arrived at the Bruges (Brugge), Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'Scheepsloperij Bakker N. 1972, to Poul Christensen, of Aalborg, Denmark, for 'upp-huggning' (whatever that means! In 1974 the vessel was towed to Norway, renamed Fjordcem, & used, after installation (by A/S Hymo? long (82.45 metres) overall, 78.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 (or 10) knots, signal letters GMDD. The WWW record for this ship is modest - but the search terms i.e. I do not like to 'reward' e Bay vendors by linking to images that bear excessive intrusive logos. The vessel was sold, in 1972, to Sanastasia Ltd., of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Sanastasia. 7, 1977, while en route from Bulgaria to Apapa Quay at Lagos, Nigeria, via Conarkry, Guinea, with a general cargo, the vessel suffered an explosion in her engine room. It would seem that the vessel was converted in 1968 - from coal to oil burning I presume. But the 'demolition' of Bulk I was in progress at Lindholmen in Sep. Andy Larsson, via 3, has provided two images of the vessel at Varberg, Sweden, in Jun. Part of the above was assembled from WWW data 'snippets', easily misinterpreted. The company expanded into transporting coal as well as selling it. 1969, the vessel arrived at the Inverkeithing facilities of 'T. Do please note that the above data does not perfectly match the names & dates at the head of this section, which data originated, I read, in J. Ships at that time were of modest size, mainly brigs & barques up to a few hundred tons.A list of the Sunderland built vessels referenced in these pages is at the top of page 040. Barkes would seem to have been the shipbuilder & the lion's share of the ship's building must surely have been conducted at a shipyard.A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040. And whatever George Clark (1815/1883 or maybe 1885) contributed to the partnership, which contribution you would think would relate to engines or to the use of metals generally, would be secondary to the carpentry/shipbuilding skills necessary for its then building - absent any record that the Loftus was steam engine powered. But in difficult weather conditions & with the pumps failing, the vessel could not enter the harbour & was abandoned by its crew on Aug. The crew was rescued by Rockaway, whose own crew aboard Wychwood were then saved in most difficult conditions. 14, 1955, at a.m., the vessel sank at Five Fathom's Hole (at extreme right in this 'Flash' map). The Marine Court of Inquiry concluded that the primary cause of the stranding was the negligence of her master, Captain Aeron Thompson (both 3 & 4 rather state Thomas) - navigational & communication errors, also the ship was not equipped with a chart of Bermuda. 77.2 metres long overall, 73.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 240 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots (11 knots at trials). Built for 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company in 1968 became 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.'. At N/6.12.13W, about 10 miles SW of Tuskar Rock Light, off the SE coast of Ireland near Rosslare. Tom advises that his father, also named Thomas (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. shipping company in existence, (dates from 1730), they were also, I read, one of the largest coal factoring companies in the U. If you can provide additional data, do please consider doing so. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1856/57 thru 1866/67, & I had thought not thereafter - clearly not so. White of South Shields, initially for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. The Mercantile Navy List of 1867, lists Thomas White, of South Shields, as the vessel's then owner. No detail as to what happened to her at that time has yet come to hand. The business reopened in 1844 under John Barkes, who had by then shipbuilding in his blood - he apparently trained as a shipwright & draughtsman under James Laing, & may have built ships at both Milford Haven & at South Hylton before going into business at Wreath Quay. Her rudder being damaged & under most difficult conditions (high winds from hurricane Diane) she was towed by the stern towards St. Crew from Rockaway joined the ship's crew in trying to save the vessel. Per 1 & 2 (both Stephenson Clarke), 3 (image, Ardingly), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Tom advises that his father, also named Thomas (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Sulzer relates in some way to the diesel engine builder of that name. shipping company in existence, (dates from 1730), they were also, I read, one of the largest coal factoring companies in the U. Ltd., of London, with Le Blond the managers, possibly of South Shields - no further change of vessel name. 14, 1981, while en route from Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Bilbao, Spain, with a cargo of scrap iron, the vessel capsized & sank. 104.8 metres (344 ft.) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. 28, 1953 by Lady Merrett, as you can see in the wonderful launch image at left, kindly provided by Tom Millar. A book, written by Peter Cox, about the company was published in 1980, entitled 'A Link with Tradition - The story of Stephenson Clarke Shipping Limited 1730-1980'. There were many Barkers' & the historical record, even census & local directory data, is quite confused particularly re the names of Barkes & Barker. 1 (a Google translation into English of this Danish web page. Thanks to Niels Hald-Andersen I can advise you that in or about 1868 the vessel was acquired by J. through 1842/3 when the depression known as the 'Hungry Forties' put him & many others out of business.

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